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Sunday, May 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of German universities and national socialism found in the catalog.

German universities and national socialism

Edward Yarnall Hartshorne

German universities and national socialism

by Edward Yarnall Hartshorne

  • 230 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by G. Allen & Unwin in London .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Germany.
    • Subjects:
    • Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei.,
    • Universities and colleges -- Germany.,
    • Education and state -- Germany.

    • Edition Notes

      Statement[by] Edward Yarnall Hartshorne.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsLA728 .H36
      The Physical Object
      Pagination184 p. :
      Number of Pages184
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6363999M
      LC Control Number38000420
      OCLC/WorldCa3895041

      About The Book. All Chapters Chapter 5 Readings. Get Started; This chapter chronicles the National Socialist revolution that swept through Germany in , and it examines the choices individual Germans were forced to confront as a result. Learn how the Nazis pushed their ideology onto German universities, and how academics like. Coordinates. Nazi Germany is the common English name for the German state between and , when Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Party (NSDAP) controlled the country, which they transformed into a Hitler's rule, Germany became a totalitarian state where nearly all aspects of life were controlled by the government. The official name of the state was Capital and largest city: Berlin, 52°31′N 13°23′E .

        Harold Jantz papers, Noted professor of German literature at Northwestern, Johns Hopkins, and Duke Universities, and collector of German baroque literature. This collection includes professional correspondence, note cards, research and teaching files, essays, offprints and reprints of articles by Jantz and scholars associated with him, and other Author: Elizabeth Dunn. The National Socialist Program originated at a DAP congress in Vienna, then was taken to Munich, by the civil engineer and theoretician Rudolf Jung, who, having explicitly supported Hitler, had been expelled from Czechoslovakia, because of his political agitation. Rudolf Jung (16 April - 11 December ) was an instrumental force and agitator of German Bohemian .

      roots of National Socialism, either in West German universities or in the sphere of public opinion.2 The first task, then, in the development of a Marxist theory of fascism and National Socialism, was to critique the reception of the phenomenon. This critique had its historical origins in the mids with the emergence. German higher education became the model for higher education in many other countries. Yet even in late 19th-century Germany, a considerable gap between idea and reality was already apparent. Daniel Fallon () sub-titled his famous book on the German university “a heroic ideal in conflict with the modern world.” A small institution at the.


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German universities and national socialism by Edward Yarnall Hartshorne Download PDF EPUB FB2

German universities and national socialism. Cambridge, Harvard University Press [] (OCoLC) Online version: Hartshorne, Edward Yarnall, German universities and national socialism.

Cambridge, Harvard University Press [] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Edward Yarnall Hartshorne. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Hartshorne, Edward Yarnall, German universities and national socialism.

London: G. Allen & Unwin, []. The German Universities and National Socialism [Edward Hartshorne] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The German Universities and National SocialismAuthor: Edward Hartshorne. National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), more commonly known as Nazism (/ ˈ n ɑː t s i ɪ z əm, ˈ n æ t-/), is the ideology and practices associated with the Nazi Party—officially the National Socialist German Workers' Party (Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP)—in Nazi Germany, and of other far-right groups with similar ideas and aims.

The number of students decreased dramatically due to the urgent need to expand the German Armed Forces: there were far fewer than the expec men and women registered inwhich led to a shortage of young academics although, since the number of women at German universities had actually been growing.

In the United States, policies frequently branded as “socialist” — health care for all, a national minimum wage, and tuition-free universities — have. German-born University of Pittsburgh (previously Harvard, Indiana University, and Boston University) historian Fritz K.

Ringer () addressed this paradox in “The Decline of the German Mandarins: The German Academic Community, " (, ), a historical and sociological study emphasizing the social position of university Cited by: The period of National Socialism from to had a dramatic effect on German science.

Scientific fields were expected to support the abhorrent ideology of the Nazis. Many great researchers had to fear persecution and even worse. Many of. Frankfurt was the first university the Nazis tackled, precisely because it was the most self-confidently liberal of major German universities, with a faculty that prided itself on its allegiance to scholarship, freedom of conscience, and democracy.

The Nazis knew that control of Frankfurt University would mean control of German academia. World Socialist Web Site work and helps explain the role that German universities played in the greatest crimes in the history of humanity.

as it had been under National Socialism—by the. This study explains the rise and evaluates the strength of the National Socialist Students' Association (NSDStB) during the whole period of its existence from to Originally published in The Princeton Legacy Pages: Students and National Socialism in Germany.

Course Book ed. Princeton University Press, susceptibility to National Socialism, see Peter D. Stachura, The German Youth Movement universities, and it gives the lie to the assertion that Ham­ Cited by: 9.

The book burning in Berlin, On student groups at universities across Germany carried out a series of book burnings of works that the students and leading Nazi party members associated with an “un-German spirit.” Enthusiastic crowds witnessed the burning of books by Brecht, Einstein, Freud, Mann and Remarque, among.

The role of German psychologists under National Socialism and the impact of the Second World War on professional psychology in Germany have become issues that are at Author: Wolfgang Schönpflug. Physics and National Socialism: An Anthology of Primary Sources Letter to Gustav Mie, Nov. 22, 35 M. Wien: Physics at German Universities, late Nov.

36 Law on the Retirement and Transfer of Professors as a Result of the Reorganization of the German System of Higher Education, Jan. 21, 37 M. Nordmeyer: Letter to Lise Pages: 1 Aim and General Description of the Anthology The purpose of this anthology is to introduce the English speaking public to the wide spectrum of texts authored predominently by physicists portraying the ac tual and perceived role of physics in the Nazi state.

Up to now no broad and well balanced documentation of German physics during this time has been available in English. Individuality, moral autonomy, and cultural diversity were dominant and recurring themes in German liberalism.

Until his last work, The Myth of the State, Cassirer wrote very little on political subjects. He began writing this book inafter being commissioned by Fortune Magazine to write an article on National Socialism, or Nazism. The Nazi "reform" of the German university system placed in its historical setting and described in factual detail.

Book Reviews. Capsule Reviews The German Universities and National Socialism. The German Universities and National Socialism. By Edward Yarnall Hartshorne, Jr.

Restrictions at German universities before the Nazi seizure of power and during the National Socialist consolidation Dr. Taja Kramberger Summary: Article sets out a socio-historical context and a conceptual orientation of the National Socialist university reforms in the Third Reich.

The youth-oriented Nazi movement had always attracted a sizable following among right-leaning university students. Even back in the s they sensed Nazism might be the wave of the future.

They joined the National Socialist German Students' League, put on swastika armbands and harassed any anti-Nazi teachers. In the German universities, where National Socialism gained its earliest footholds and which later became its strongest bastions, dueling was an accepted practice.

Although the liberal-Jewish governments in Germany after the First World War attempted to ban dueling, it persisted illegally until it was again legalized by the National Socialists. In one of the most distinguished American historians, John A. Garraty of Columbia University, created a stir with his article “The New Deal, National Socialism, and the Great Depression.”.universities should exhibit greater ‘responsibility’ towards the German race, German language and German literature; weeks later they demanded that all ‘un-German’ books be removed from the libraries.

Not long after that, book burning began “in the public squares of numerous German cities” p It was students who did the Size: KB.